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The Health of Your Eyes is Our Focus
Phone: 440.238.5030
17534 Royalton Rd
Strongsville, OH 44136

What You Need to Know About Cataracts

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1GU4cveaiJ8 What is a Cataract?  The natural lens is the structure located behind the iris or the colored part of the eye.  The lens focuses light onto the macula, the portion of the retina responsible for central vision.  Over time the natural lens becomes cloudy, hazy or not clear.  When the natural lens is no longer clear, it is called a cataract.  Cataracts can develop from normal aging, an eye injury, or prolonged use of certain medications.  Almost all individuals older than 65 years-old have...

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Typical Cataract Instructions -1st week

Your typical eye drop instructions after surgery are: Please take DUREZOL, CIPROFLOXACIN, and any artificial tears 4 times a day in the surgical eye. Please take BROMDAY once a day in the surgical eye. Wait 5 minutes in between eye drops.  The order does not matter. CHECK YOUR VISION EACH DAY by covering your non-operative eye with your glasses off.  Your vision should not get significantly worse than the previous day’s vision.  CALL DR. ALESSIO with any significant DECREASE IN VISION, EYE PAIN, REDNESS or DISCHARGE.  His phone...

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Typical Cataract Instructions – Weeks 2-4

Your typical eye drop instructions for weeks 2-4 after cataract surgery are: Please take the DUREZOL and BROMDAY once a day in the surgical eye.  These drops heal the inside of the eye. Artificial tears, such as Systane Ultra, can be used with any signs of dryness to help the surface heal. Nothing should get significantly worse.  Call Dr. Alessio with any significant decrease in vision, eye pain, redness or discharge.  His phone numbers are given to all surgical patients. You can discontinue wearing the eye shield at night, unless you...

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What You Need to Know About Glaucoma

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GZatZ7AGMFM Glaucoma is a disease where the pressure usually is too high in your eye and causes damage to the optic nerve.  Your optic nerve is responsible for transmitting the vision from your eye to your brain.  Your optic nerve acts like the computer cable that connects your computer hard drive to the monitor. We are born with over one million fibers in each optic nerve.  Five thousand optic nerve fibers are lost per year in the aging process alone.  Glaucoma accelerates the loss of optic nerve fibers....

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Laser for Narrow/Closed Angle Glaucoma

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xGcEvwUhGq0 Laser Peripheral Iridectomy is the treatment of choice for individuals at risk for, or in an attack of acute angle closure glaucoma. Acute angle Closure Glaucoma is a sudden painful attack that usually involves the following symptoms:  Headache, Nausea, Vomiting, Blurry Vision and a Red Painful Eye. Acute angle closure Glaucoma can lead to PERMENENT BLINDNESS within 24 hours. The treatment for acute angle closure glaucoma is a Laser Peripheral Iridectomy (LPI).  An LPI uses focused light energy to...

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What You Need to Know About Macular Degeneration

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J7LxcJ83rKc Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) is a condition that causes damage and loss of function of the central part of the retina called the macula.  AMD causes central vision loss for both near and far vision.  Unfortunately, AMD is the leading cause of severe vision loss in people 65 years of age and older. There are two main types of AMD – Wet and Dry.  Ninety percent of patients who have AMD have the “dry” form.  Dry AMD causes gradual vision loss over many years.  Wet AMD is much...

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Injections for Diabetic Eye Disease

Diabetic Retinopathy can cause vision loss.  Those individuals that develop diabetic retinopathy may benefit from injections in specific circumstances of diabetic eye disease.

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What You Need to Know About Dry Eyes

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0iyTeCEkjPg Dry eye is one of the most undertreated eye conditions in the United States.  In the healthy eye, tears are constantly being produced and then drain into your nose.  A healthy tear film is vital not only to the comfort of your eyes, but the quality of your vision. FACT:  The most common cause of tearing is a dry eye.  It only makes sense if you understand how the eye works.  When you develop a poor tear film and your eye dries out, your eye sends a signal to the brain.  The brain responds by...

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Blepharitis

Blepharitis is a chronic and frequent condition of the eyelids when dandruff-like debris builds up along the base of the eyelashes.  Blepharitis also can plug the oil glands responsible for producing the protective layer to your tear film.  Blepharitis can often be associated with chalazion, stye or hordeolum formations. Blepharitis will cause symptoms that include a sandy, gritty sensation with occasional burning and tearing. Initial conservative treatment includes:  Warm Compresses Apply warm washcloth 1-3 times a day for 5-10...

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Chalazion or Stye

There are approximately 30 glands in the upper and lower eyelids that are responsible for producing oil that stabilizes your tear film.  These glands are called meibomian glands.  The oil produced by meibomian glands protects your tears from evaporating.  Occasionally, one of these meibomian glands can become blocked and backfill causing a red swollen lump on your upper or lower eyelid called a chalazion. A chalazion is often confused with a stye, which also appears as a lump on your eyelid.  However, a stye is an infection of an eyelash...

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‘Pink Eye’ – Viral Conjunctivitis

Conjunctivitis is inflammation in the conjunctiva or white part of the eye.  The most common type of ‘pink eye’ is a viral conjunctivitis.  Viral conjunctivitis is a contagious infection spread by contact.  Hand hygiene is very important in preventing the spread of the infection. Viral conjunctivitis is not curable.  Antibiotics only cure bacterial infections.  The common cold is an example of one type of viral infection.  It may take 1-3 weeks for your body to fight off this infection.  Upper respiratory infection or cold symptoms...

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What You Need to Know About Floaters & Flashes

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kEA6OKAIy_Y The most common cause of new onset flashing lights and floaters is a Posterior Vitreous Detachment or PVD.  The vitreous is a clear, gel-like material that fills the center of your eye.  The vitreous shrinks and liquefies with time.  As a result the vitreous eventually will detach from the retina.  The retina is neurosensory tissue responsible for collecting your vision and sending it to your brain by way of the optic nerve.  PVDs commonly occur in people later in life, but also after eye...

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Fuchs’ Dystrophy

Fuchs’ dystrophy is by definition a bilateral inherited disease that affects the cornea.  The cornea is the front part of the eye that people put their contact lenses on and covers the colored part of the eye (iris).  The cornea is responsible for focusing light rays into the back of the eye. There are five layers in the cornea: Epithelium – surface layer Bowman’s membrane Stroma – is responsible for most of the cornea’s thickness Descemet’s membrane Endothelium – inside layer of the cornea In Fuchs dystrophy, cells in the...

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Corneal Abrasion & Erosion

The cornea is the clear structure in the central front part of the eye.  It is the structure that contact lenses rest on.  The cornea covers the iris (the color part of the eye) and pupil (the black round hole in the center of the iris). The cornea is exposed to injury from fingernails, makeup brushes, rubbing and foreign body injuries.  When the surface of the cornea is scratched it is called a Corneal Abrasion.  Symptoms of a corneal abrasion include sharp eye pain, tearing, light sensitivity, redness, irritation and blurry...

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Red Eye – Subconjunctival Hemorrhage

Did you develop a painless red eye that looks really bad in the mirror?  If there were no other symptoms, such as vision loss or discharge, you may have experienced a benign subconjunctival hemorrhage.  This video better explains this problem.

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What You Need to Know About Eyelid Problems

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wlm5iTnbnB8 There are two main types of conditions that can cause droopy eyelids: ptosis and dermatochalasis. Ptosis is when the eyelid margin is lower, usually as a result of a weakened eyelid muscle called the levator muscle. Ptosis in adults usually is caused by the levator muscle separating or stretching from its insertion.  Ptosis in adults can often occurs after eye surgery, trauma or after many years of wearing gas permeable contact lenses.  The procedure for ptosis surgery involves reattaching and...

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